National Tree Day Planting Thank You

team work is needed to get a lot of plants into the ground

team work is needed to get a lot of plants into the ground

It was great to see so many people out planting on the weekend. Some areas had lovely warm sunshine and others had bursts of hail, sleet and constant wind. Thanks to all those who persevered and made sure thousands of plants went into the ground.

this is hail not fertilizer

this is hail not fertilizer

Having participated in a few planting events recently it has been interesting to see different methods used. Some of the tips I picked up include:

planted into a sprayed out site with a weed mat added for an even  better start

planted into a sprayed out site with a weed mat added for an even better start

  • make sure you do the weed control, either a couple of applications of herbicide or physical removal of the weeds by chipping them out. This really pays off in the long run.
  • don’t cut back on the preparation, if it is possible to deep rip a site then rip it and plant adjacent to the rip line not in it.
  • do some rabbit baiting and burrow ripping to remove the rabbits and remove harbour and add tree guards. Fence the site if you need to exclude stock.
  • water the plants thoroughly the night before planting by immersing them in water until the bubbles stop coming out of the pots.
  • mix up the plants in the trays before you start if you want to get  a better spread of plant varieties.
  • loosen the plants in tubes so they pull out easily and are not damaged and ensure they are weed free.

 

 

 

 

Celebrate at the Yellow Gum Festival – Bannockburn

The contrast of Yellow  Gums trunks with sword-sedge

The contrast of Yellow Gums trunks with sword-sedge

Saturday July 25th will be the Friends of Bannockburn Bush 18th Yellow Gum Festival. Come and enjoy a walk and talk. Bring camera and binoculars.
There will be pumpkin soup and gourmet damper on a stick as well as some fine (BYO) wine. We will begin inside the main entrance off the Bannockburn-Shelford Road at 10:00am. Enquiries to Stuart McCallum on: 0438 904 961

Have you seen a wombat?

There have been a few reported sighting of wombats in places where they haven’t been seen for many years. Sightings may be recorded  on the Atlas of Living Australia.

WomSAT is a new resource for communities to record sightings of wombats across the country. Australia’s unique wombats are in crisis and their numbers are declining and your help is needed to protect them by recording where you see wombats and their burrows in your local area  click on the link.   The aim of the project is also to track the incidence of sarcoptic mange which is impacting on wombats where thick scabs form on their skin and hinder sight and movement, leading to starvation and eventual death.