No Train to Catch

I am still on about fungi and these photos were taken near Wombat Station in the Wombat Forest. If you rug up and go for a walk at this time of year you should always see some fungi. They come in all shapes and sizes.  What we see is just the showy top or fruiting bodies and underneath there is a lot of work going on. The rest of the fungi is breaking down  organic matter and recycling nutrients. They are vital for healthy ecosystems. Some fungi are food for wallabies.

DELWP Community Conversation

Epacris impressa in Canadian Forest Park

The Department of Land Water and Planning Grampians Region has a regular newsletter DELWP Community Conversation, keeping the community updated about some of the work and discussions in which they are involved.

You are welcome to subscribe to receive it by email. If you would like to know the extent  of the Grampians Region boundary here is a link  

Another stage in the life of a tree friend

We have a very large tree on our property and even though it is  dead, it was there when we purchased the property and is almost like a friend. It provided a place to attach a bat box and for birds and bats to roost. The trunk even without bark, has an interesting texture and the size of the tree makes it a dominant feature in our bit of bush.

This tree probably has a story to tell. Someone ring-barked it but it never was felled, and it has been through a fire. In the gold era nearly all the trees were harvested within a ‘5 mile’ radius of the town, for use in mines and to fuel furnaces. This tree is probably a messmate, Eucalyptus obliqua.

A few weeks ago in one of the storms, there was a big crash and half the tree fell to the ground. The bat box survived to be reattached elsewhere.

An opportunity for firewood you may think, but after such a long life it will be left to rot down and disappear back into the soil. We still have half a habitat tree which for us, is a valuable asset.